Curtis, Kuster Introduce Bipartisan Bill to Support Ski Areas as Nation Recovers from COVID-19

Curtis, Kuster Introduce Bipartisan Bill to Support Ski Areas as Nation Recovers from COVID-19

**The Ski Hill Resources for Economic Development (SHRED) Act would reallocate undedicated funds collected from ski area permit fees to improve land management and visitor services in local National Forests**

 

June 12,  2021

Washington, DC — This week, Representatives John Curtis (R-UT) and Annie Kuster (D-NH), co-chairs of the House Ski and Snowboard Caucus, introduced the Ski Hill Resources for Economic Development (SHRED) Act, bipartisan legislation to support ski areas across the country that are operating on National Forest System lands and bring money back to local forests. The bill is also cosponsored by Congressman Joe Neguse (D-CO) and Congressman Doug LaMalfa (R-CA) and companion legislation was introduced in the Senate by Senators Michael Bennet (D-CO) and John Barrasso (R-WY).

Currently, fees related to the permitting of ski areas on U.S. Forest Service land are given to the Treasury Department, where the funds are not dedicated for any specific purpose. The Ski Hill Resources for Economic Development (SHRED) Act seeks to change this system, and instead direct a portion of the fees to the National Forest System, where they will be used for local infrastructure improvements, avalanche forecasting and safety, and improved visitor services. The legislation also directs money to improve the ski area permitting process, helping ski areas facilitate investment in rural mountain communities.

“Utah is proud to have the greatest snow on Earth, bringing many opportunities for skiing and snowboarding and attracting tourists from around the globe,” said Congressman Curtis. “I believe it is one of our responsibilities to ensure we leave the land we recreate in better than we found it – including our beautiful National Forests. As the co-chair of the Congressional Ski and Snowboard Caucus, I am proud to partner with my fellow co-chair Rep. Kuster on this important legislation that will not only support recreation but will ensure the forests are healthy and maintained for future generations. The SHRED Act would allow the Forest Service to retain ski area permit fees at the forest that they originate in to be used for increased maintenance and improvements on those lands. I am looking forward to working with my colleagues to quickly advance this important bill through Congress.”

“Outdoor recreation and skiing are cornerstones of New Hampshire’s economy and the Granite State way of life,” said Congresswoman Kuster. “As co-chair of the Bipartisan Congressional Ski and Snowboard Caucus, my Ski Hill Resources for Economic Development (SHRED) Act will steer more New Hampshire dollars back home by investing fees paid by our Granite State ski mountains into our local forests and communities to help create more year-round jobs and bolster our regional economies for generations to come.”

 

Statements of Support

“The SHRED Act is important in one regard in that it represents a commitment to our ski areas and the National Forests on which they operate,” said Jessyca Keeler, President, Ski New Hampshire. “But more importantly, it’s an investment in the communities where the funds from this act will be allocated. By setting aside dollars to make permitting and program administration more efficient, more projects can get off the ground in a timely manner, leading to increased economic activity in the often rural and remote areas that stand to benefit from this legislation.”

“As more and more people head outdoors to recreate in these challenging times, this investment in Forest Service capacity and outdoor recreation could not come at a better time,” said Kelly Pawlak, President/CEO, National Ski Areas Association. “Ski areas applaud Reps. Kuster, Curtis, Neguse and LaMalfa for their leadership and bipartisan efforts in support of the SHRED Act. Mountain communities, ski areas, outfitter guides and the millions of people who recreate on the National Forests will all benefit from this critical legislation.”

“What the SHRED Act does for ski areas is a solid model for all facilitated recreation experiences,” said Aaron Bannon, Executive Director, America Outdoors Association. “Outdoor recreation permit fees should be reallocated at the site, should be used to improve and enhance facilitated recreation experiences, and should be made available to help other sites address recreation programming needs that may not have the resources necessary at the local level.”

“Snowsports Industries America (SIA) fully supports the retention of ski area fees through the Ski Hill Resources for Economic Development (SHRED) Act,” said Nick Sargent, President, Snowsports Industries America. “This important legislation will provide valuable resources to improve the Forest Service’s capacity to administer permits and make critical and timely decisions on improving public lands infrastructure and facilitating implementation of year-round recreation activities.”

 

Background

Specifically, the SHRED Act would:

  • Keep Ski Fees Local: By establishing a Ski Area Fee Retention Account to retain a portion of the fees that ski areas pay to the Forest Service. For National Forests that receive less than $15 million in ski fees annually, 75% of the fees are retained. For forests that receive more than $15 million in ski fees annually, 60% of the ski fees would be retained. The retained funds are available for authorized uses at the local National Forest.
  • Support Winter Recreation: In each National Forest, 75% of the retained funds are directly available to support Forest Service Ski Area Program and permitting needs, process proposals for improvement projects, train staff, and prepare for wildfire. Any excess funds can be directed to other National Forests that host ski areas for the same uses. After all of the winter recreation uses have been addressed across the country, excess funds are carried over to the pot of funding that supports broad recreation needs.
  • Address Broad Recreation Needs: In each National Forest, 25% of the retained funds are available to support a broad set of local recreation management and community needs, including special use permit administration, visitor services, trailhead improvements, facility maintenance, and affordable workforce housing. This set-aside would dramatically increase some Forest Service unit’s budgets to meet the growing visitation and demand for outdoor recreation.

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Curtis, Lofgren Introduce Bipartisan Legislation to Eliminate Arbitrary Per-Country Limits on Employment-Based Visas

Curtis, Lofgren Introduce Bipartisan Legislation to Eliminate Arbitrary Per-Country Limits on Employment-Based Visas

The Equal Access to Green cards for Legal Employment (EAGLE) Act of 2021 Phases Out 7% Per-Country Cap on Employment-Based Immigrant Visas & Raises Per-Country Cap on Family-Sponsored Visas to 15%

June 4  2021

Washington, DC — Congressman John Curtis (R-UT) and Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) introduced H.R. 3648, the Equal Access to Green cards for Legal Employment (EAGLE) Act of 2021, a bill that will benefit the U.S. economy by allowing American employers to focus on hiring immigrants based on their merit, not their birthplace. H.R. 3648 phases out the 7% per-country limit on employment-based immigrant visas. The bill also raises the 7% per-country limit on family-sponsored visas to 15%. Its predecessor, the Fairness for High Skilled Immigrants Act, passed the House in the 116th Congress with a resounding bipartisan vote of 365 to 65.

Rep. Curtis said, “The 2020 census showed that Utah has the fastest-growing state in the nation—in no small part due to the major growth and innovation in the technology sector, bringing thousands of new jobs to the state. At the same time, Utah is tied for the lowest unemployment rate in the country, leaving many companies to rely on foreign workers and navigate our complicated immigration system when there is a shortage of American’s seeking these positions. The bipartisan EAGLE Act will create a more fair employment-based visa system by eliminating per-country limitations and creating a first-come, first-served system focused on merit instead of country of origin, making it easier for Utah’s businesses to expand and compete globally.”

“We all know that our immigration system is severely broken, and it has been broken for decades,” said Rep. Lofgren, Chair of the House Subcommittee on Immigration and Citizenship. “The basic framework for allocating immigrant visas dates back to the middle of the 20th century and was last seriously updated in 1990, when Congress established the worldwide numerical limits on visas and the 7% per-country cap that still exists today. Over time, these limitations have led to backlogs that were unimaginable in 1990. The effect has been that countries with relatively small populations are allocated the same number of visas as a relatively large-population country. The result? A person from a large-population country with extraordinary qualifications who could contribute greatly to our economy and create jobs waits behind a person with lesser qualifications from a smaller country. It makes no sense. Because of this, we are now seeing recruiters from outside America luring those with the highest skills away from the U.S. That hurts our economy. The bipartisan EAGLE Act moves our country toward a system that de-emphasizes birthplace and better serves America. Simply put, it will allow U.S. companies to focus on what they do best – hiring smart people to create products and services, which creates jobs in our districts.”

Background

The employment-based visa system provides permanent residence (or “green cards”) to individuals whose work contributes to U.S. economic growth and enhances our competitive advantage. To qualify, a sponsoring employer generally must advertise and prove that they are unable to find a qualified U.S. worker to fill the position. Thus, although America’s employment-based visa system starts out as “merit based,” what happens next has nothing to do with merit or skills—visas are allocated based on the intending immigrant’s country of birth.

Approximately 95% of employment-based immigrants currently live and work in the United States on temporary visas while waiting for a visa to become available. Some of these individuals remain in temporary status for many years, if not decades, because of the caps applied to their country of nationality. The new, phased-in system, established in the bipartisan EAGLE Act, would help ease the backlog for those who wait the longest.

Like the Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act that passed the House in July 2019, the bill:

  • phases out the 7% per-country cap for employment-based immigrant visas; and
  • raises the 7% per-country limit on family-sponsored visas to 15%.

Like the version of the Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act that passed the Senate in December 2020, the bill:

  • includes a longer nine-year transition period to ensure that no countries are excluded from receiving visas while the per-country caps are phased out;
  • strengthens the H-1B temporary visa program; and
  • provides an option for individuals who have been waiting in the immigrant visa backlog for two years to file a green card application, although the application cannot be approved until a visa becomes available.

Click here for a section-by-section of the bipartisan EAGLE Act.

Click here for full text of the bipartisan EAGLE Act.

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Curtis, Neguse, Bipartisan Wildfire Caucus Members Request Robust Federal Funding to Tackle Western Wildfires

Curtis, Neguse, Bipartisan Wildfire Caucus Members Request Robust Federal Funding to Tackle Western Wildfires

May 10,  2021

Washington, DC — Congressman John Curtis (R-UT) and Congressman Joe Neguse (D-CO) are leading members of the Bipartisan Wildfire Caucus in a letter to Appropriators in Congress urging them to include robust funding to programs in the Interior and Environment Appropriations Bill that will support improved wildfire preparedness, mitigation, and response across the United States. The letter indicates that such funds could be used to increase the pace and scale of hazardous fuels management and forest restoration; improve ecosystem health; reduce the risk of severe flooding and erosion in forests after fire; protect critical watersheds, and bolster support for the wildland firefighting workforce. 

“It is imperative that the federal government prepares to respond and recover after a wildfire starts,” said Curtis, Co-Chair of the Bipartisan Wildfire Caucus. “Equally important is our ability to prevent disasters in the first place and ensuring that mitigation programs are adequately funded is the first step. I am proud to have led this letter with the Bipartisan Wildfire Caucus advocating for robust funding for wildfire-related programs to bolster our critical wildfire prevention, response, and recovery programs.”

“The west experienced a devastating wildfire season this year. In Colorado, we experienced three of the largest wildfires in state history, two of which impacted communities in my district,” said Neguse, Co-Chair of the Bipartisan Wildfire Caucus. “Such a historic challenge requires a proportionate response. The Bipartisan Wildfire Caucus is focused on finding science-based solutions to tackle these fires and invest in mitigation and response. It’s crucial that this year’s spending bill include robust funding for programs that will support these efforts, and support our communities, our firefighters, and our lands.”

Member of Congress Statements of Support

“In Arizona, the 2020 wildfire season saw 2,520 wildfires burn nearly 980,000 acres of state, federal, and tribal lands in almost every corner of our state—nearly doubling the 520,000 acres that burned in 3,627 fires over the previous two years combined,” said O’Halleran. “As a member of the Bipartisan Wildfire Caucus, I’m working with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to ensure that our appropriations will fully fund desperately-needed wildfire preparedness, mitigation, and response operations.”

“Conditions in Utah will likely yield a difficult wildfire season this year, and it is imperative that we use our resources to alleviate the adverse impacts this will have on our lands and communities,” said Moore. “I am honored to join my colleagues on the Bipartisan Wildfire Caucus in requesting funds that will provide our firefighters and land managers the resources they need to ensure we effectively prevent and mitigate the devastating effects of wildfire.”

“Our forests are facing increasingly serious risk of severe wildfires, and providing the resources for more active forest management is the most effective action we can take to quickly improve their condition,” LaMalfa said. “Congress must fund smart and scientific wildfire mitigation efforts on our federal lands and ensure we are able to respond when wildfires inevitably occur. The 2021 fire season is already starting, so we must act quickly on this.” 

“Western wildfires break records year after year, with the deadly wildfire season in 2020 taking a historic personal and financial toll on Oregon communities, destroying many in my district,” said Schrader. “Congress must ensure the Wildfire Disaster Fund I championed receives full financial support like other disaster funds to combat the longstanding and unresolved issues which have led to a health crisis in our national forests. This means putting real money into active forest management, including mandatory prescribed burns, tree harvesting and thinning and brush removal and other fuel treatment procedures to ensure that when wildfires do happen, they do not grow out of control. Increased investments must also elevate our firefighting efforts, including advancing our attack on fires near rural communities, so public lands will be protected and preserved for future generations.”

“Last year, Oregonians faced the most devastating wildfire season in recent history, with fires destroying thousands of structures and, sadly, taking lives,” said DeFazio. “Wildfires are getting larger and burning with more severity every year—It’s imperative that we greatly increase funding to address wildfire preparedness, response, and recovery efforts. To do otherwise would be grossly irresponsible.”

Background

The National Interagency Fire Center reported that U.S. wildfires burned 10.27 million acres as of December 31, 2020— the highest yearly total since accurate records began in 1983. Colorado experienced the three largest wildfires in state history. In California alone, nearly 4.2 million acres burned, more than double the previous record. U.S. wildfire damages in 2020 totaled $16.5 billion, ranking it as the third-costliest year on record. Three separate fires in California and one in Oregon generated over $1 billion in losses. 12 additional fires in California, Oregon, Colorado, and Washington each caused over $100 million in direct losses. The direct damages from Oregon’s Beachie Creek Fire alone totaled $1.6 billion, making it Oregon’s costliest fire on record.

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Curtis Joins Congressional Bike Caucus, Tours Bicycling Infrastructure in District

Curtis Joins Congressional Bike Caucus, Tours Bicycling Infrastructure in District

April 6,  2021

Washington, DC—Representative John Curtis (R-UT) released the following statement after joining the Congressional Bike Caucus this month, signaling his commitment to support biking as a bipartisan approach to address car emissions and transportation issues in American cities.

“As Mayor, I was proud to lead by example and biked to work every day to do my part to decrease emissions and support my personal health,” said Curtis. “We should be doing all we can to make it easier for local communities to plan efficiently for non-vehicle transportation. I am proud to join the bipartisan bike caucus to share these benefits with my colleagues in Washington.”

The announcement comes after a recent visit to Provo where Curtis joined BikeWalk Provo on its “World-famous Bike Tour” around central Provo, highlighting many of the great things he himself was a champion of. During the ride, BikeWalk Provo volunteers encouraged Rep. Curtis to join the Congressional Bike Caucus.

 

Statement of Support

Austin Taylor, Executive Director of BikeWalk Provo:

“We thank Rep. Curtis for the contributions he’s made for safe and accessible biking and walking infrastructure in Provo. Provo has benefited from his vision, and we believe Utah and our nation will as well.”

Background

The Congressional Bike Caucus includes more than 100 members. The mission of the Caucus is to be the “voice in our nation’s capital for millions of cyclists actively working for safer streets, pro-bike policies, and livable communities.”

Joining the Bike Caucus continues Rep. Curtis’s long history of bike advocacy. Prior to his election to Congress in 2017, Curtis served as Mayor of Provo from 2010 to 2017 where he championed active transportation solutions including protected bike lanes on Cougar Boulevard, UVX (Utah Valley Express) bus rapid transit, and Provo River Trail improvements. The Congressman views biking as part of a bipartisan solution to address climate change.  

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Curtis, Romney Introduce Bill to Advance the Popular Bonneville Shoreline Trail

Curtis, Romney Introduce Bill to Advance the Popular Bonneville Shoreline Trail

April 5,  2021

Washington, DC—Representative John Curtis (R-UT) and Senator Mitt Romney (R-UT) released the following statements about their legislation to enable the construction of high-priority sections of the Bonneville Shoreline Trail (BST) to enhance recreation opportunities near Utah’s most urban areas. The Bonneville Shoreline Trail Advancement Act, also supported by Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT), Rep. Chris Stewart (R-UT), Rep. Blake Moore (R-UT), and Rep. Burgess Owens (R-UT) will adjust management boundaries to allow the advancement of the BST while also designating nearby U.S. Forest Service land for permanent protection. The BST is planned to eventually connect the Idaho border to Nephi, Utah—stretching over 280 miles. The legal map for the legislation can be found here.

“This legislation balances creating new recreational opportunities with protecting the environment,” said Curtis. “With a rapidly increasing population, Salt Lake and Utah Counties are in need of more widely accessible opportunities to hike, bike, and get outdoors. This legislation will do this is a responsible manner and help pave the way for all Utahns to enjoy this world-class trail.”

“The Bonneville Shoreline Trail provides great outdoor recreational opportunities for Utahns, but several wilderness-designated areas along the trail are hampering full use of the trail,” said Romney. “We are reintroducing our legislation to adjust the boundaries of the trail to ensure that construction can be fully completed and Utahns can enjoy its wide range of recreational opportunities for many years to come.”

Statements of Support (All letters of support available here)

Utah Governor Spencer J. Cox:

“I love your effort to complete the Bonneville Shoreline Trail. As you surely know, the trail is a decades-long project with both recreational and historical significance. It has the potential to be both a beautiful recreational asset for Utah residents and a tool for teaching us about ancient Lake Bonneville and Utah’s fascinating geologic history.

For the past 30 years, numerous Utah political jurisdictions, businesses, recreational users, and private landowners have played a role in securing portions of the trial. Much remains to be done, but your bill, the Bonneville Shoreline Trail Advancement Act, is a next step in that process.” 

David Wiens, Executive Director, International Mountain Bicycling Association:

“The International Mountain Bicycling Association is excited to support the Bonneville Shore Trail Advancement Act reintroduced by Congressman John Curtis (R-UT) and Senator Mitch Romney (R-UT). The Senator and Congressman and their offices continue to be staunch supporters of public lands protection through outdoor recreation. This legislation will establish better trail connectivity to create more trails close to home, making mountain biking and trail-based recreation more accessible for communities along Utah’s Wasatch Front. We look forward to working with the Congressman and our partners in Utah on this important legislation.”

Louis Geltman, Policy Director, Outdoor Alliance:

“On behalf of the human powered outdoor recreation community, we write to express our support and gratitude for your efforts to introduce the Bonneville Shoreline Trail Advancement Act (BSTAA). The BSTAA will help facilitate completion of the multiple-use 280-mile Bonneville Shoreline Trail (BST). The proposed boundary adjustments will remove 326.27 acres from Wilderness management across 19 carefully drawn areas, and these adjustments will be offset by the addition of an equal area of new Wilderness protection in Mill Creek Canyon. These adjustments will ensure bicycle access on the BST and allow for work on the trail to proceed using tools impermissible under Wilderness management. In addition to the direct benefits of the trail itself, the BST is a central component for trail planning efforts for jurisdictions across the Wasatch Front.” 

Bill Lee, Senior Vice President for Policy, Advocacy, and Government Relations, The Trust for Public Land:

“In 2017, Utah’s outdoor recreation economy generated more than $12.3 billion in consumer spending and directly supported more than 100,000 jobs in Utah. The Bonneville Shoreline Trail Advancement Act will help to complete the vision of the Bonneville Shoreline Trail; giving mountain bikers, runners, hikers, equestrians, cross-country skiers— and families— new opportunities to get outside and enjoy the outdoors. We look forward to working with you to advance the legislation through Congress and to achieve the promise of the Bonneville Shoreline Trail.” 

Sarah Bennett, Executive Director, Trails Utah:

“Trails Utah is delighted to join forces with Congressman Curtis, IMBA and local organizations in the effort to secure a shared-use future for Northern Utah’s iconic Bonneville Shoreline Trail. The Bonneville Shoreline Trail Advancement Act is needed to maximize recreational opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts—including mountain bikers—along the populous Wasatch Front. The demand for secure access to trails and open space and the need for careful, consistent management is greatest at the wild/urban interface where the BST resides. We are enormously grateful to Congressman John Curtis for his support for this bill and the active lifestyles that Utahns enjoy. We look forward to being a part of the effort to build a sustainable and enjoyable Bonneville Shoreline Trail in the years to come.”

John Knoblock, Chairperson, Bonneville Shoreline Trail Committee:
“The Bonneville Shoreline Trail Committee was formed thirty years ago to promote development of a 280 mile long shared-use trail along the urban wildland interface of the northern Wasatch Front in Utah. However, there are many obstacles in completing the entire envisioned trail which is still only about halfway complete.  The Bonneville Shoreline Trail Advancement Act is important to overcome one of those obstacles by adjusting wilderness boundaries so that mountain bikes can use the entire trail as originally envisioned.  The Bonneville Shoreline Trail is enjoyed by thousands of trail users every year and the mountain bike community is a  large and important user group.”

Dallen Atack, League Director, Utah High School Cycling League:
“The Utah High School Cycling League has nearly 2,000 registered student-athletes and coaches living within ten minutes of the trailheads connecting to the Bonneville Shoreline Trail. As a league, our vision is to enable Utah teens to strengthen body, mind, and character through the life-long sport of cycling. We have witnessed firsthand how mountain biking has strengthened families and communities. The culture of our league and mountain biking in general is one of inclusivity and respect. We fully endorse the efforts of IMBA and other local associations striving to implement the Bonneville Shoreline Trail Advancement Act.”

Kevin Dwyer, Executive Director, Salt Lake Valley Trails Society:
“The Salt Lake Valley Trail Society enthusiastically supports the Bonneville Shoreline Trail Advancement Act as an opportunity to provide accessible outdoor recreation for a wide variety of trail users. Hikers, cyclists, families, and adaptive athletes will be sure to be recreating in a more sustainable fashion as the sections of the Bonneville Shoreline Trail facilitated by the Act are built out and authorized for local recreation. Please join us in supporting this bill and the recreation and community-building opportunities that local trails create.”

Background

The Bonneville Shoreline Trail is a popular trail in Utah that will ultimately stretch 280 miles. However, small segments of wilderness designations have prohibited biking on parts of the trail, preventing the full vision multi-use trail connecting dozens of Utah’s communities.

The Bonneville Shoreline Trail Advancement Act:

  • Releases 326 acres of wilderness, divided over more than 20 small locations, to accommodate the advancement of the Bonneville Shoreline Trail in Salt Lake County and Utah County, two population centers in high demand for additional recreation opportunities.
  • Resolves a wilderness boundary issue in Birch Canyon to ensure the trail that runs parallel to the road can be fully utilized as a multiuse trail.
  • Designates 326 acres of wilderness to preserve land formerly owned by the Boy Scouts of America in Mill Creek Canyon that fully offsets any wilderness release to accommodate the BST.

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Curtis, Peters, Grassley, Feinstein Introduce Bill to Confront Rising Threat of Methamphetamine

Curtis, Peters, Grassley, Feinstein Introduce Bill to Confront Rising Threat of Methamphetamine

March 22,  2021

Washington, DC—Representatives John Curtis (R-UT) and Scott Peters (D-CA) and Senators Chuck Grassley (R-IA) and Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) introduced the Methamphetamine Response Act, a bipartisan bill declaring methamphetamine an emerging drug threat which would require the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) to develop, implement and make public a national plan to prevent methamphetamine addiction and overdoses from becoming a crisis.

“Over the last decade, methamphetamine addiction and fatalities have skyrocketed across the United States – especially in rural areas like the ones I am proud to represent. The COVID-19 pandemic has only exacerbated the problem by spreading resources thinly and making it more difficult to connect with individuals in need of support. To combat this threat, I am proud to co-lead the bipartisan Methamphetamine Response Act, which channels the necessary resources at the highest levels of government to develop and implement a nationwide plan to prevent this dangerous drug from becoming even more prevalent in our communities,” said Curtis.

“Once known as the meth capital of the United States, San Diego has a long, arduous history in working to combat methamphetamine production and addiction,” said Peters. “Law enforcement officials still refer to our region as ‘ground zero’ for the nation’s meth problem, and a surge in the amount of the drug smuggled across the U.S. Mexico border in recent years has caused overdose cases to skyrocket. Our communities are in crisis and require the support of the government to address this issue head-on. As meth-related deaths continue to rise with each passing year, it is critical we recognize meth as an emerging threat nationwide.”

“For years, meth has taken lives and destroyed families across America, particularly in the Midwest. Though this drug is not new, drug traffickers are finding new and harmful ways to increase meth’s potency and distribution, spiking overdose rates. By declaring meth an emerging drug threat, our bill helps law enforcement better respond to the challenges presented by drug traffickers’ evolving tactics, and urges our federal partners to continue to prioritize a response and strategy to address the meth crisis,” Grassley said.

“In a single year we’ve seen psychostimulant-related overdose deaths, which include meth, spike by 42 percent,” said Feinstein. “The meth available on our streets is pure, potent and cheap and law enforcement is seizing more of the drug than ever. Two of the largest seizures on record occurred in California last year and in just a five month period, U.S. Customs and Border Protection seized more than 75,000 pounds of methamphetamine. Clearly we are in the midst of a meth crisis and we must implement a national, comprehensive plan to address this threat before it claims even more American lives.”

 

Background

  • Declares methamphetamine an emerging drug threat, as defined in section 702 of the ONDCP Reauthorization Act of 1998 
  • Requires ONDCP to develop, implement, and make public, within 90 days of enactment, a national emerging threats response plan that is specific to methamphetamine, in accordance with section 709(d) of the Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 1998. 
  • The ONDCP plan must be updated annually and include the following: 
    • An assessment of the methamphetamine threat, including the current availability of, and demand for the drug, and evidence-based prevention and treatment programs, as well as law enforcement programs; 
    • Short- and long term goals, including those focused on supply and demand reduction, and on expanding the availability and effectiveness of treatment and prevention programs;
    • Performance measures pertaining to the plan’s goals; 
    • The level of funding needed to implement the plan; and 
    • An implementation strategy, goals, and objectives for a media campaign.

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